By consolidating

The earliest sleep and memory research focused on declarative memory, which is the knowledge of fact-based information, or "what" we know (for example, the capital of France, or what you had for dinner last night).

In one research study, individuals engaged in an intensive language course were observed to have an increase in rapid-eye-movement sleep, or REM sleep.

Different types of memories are formed in new learning situations.

Other aspects of sleep also play a role: motor learning seems to depend on the amount of lighter stages of sleep, while certain types of visual learning seem to depend on the amount and timing of both deep, slow-wave sleep (SWS) and REM sleep.Further studies have suggested that REM sleep seems to be involved in declarative memory processes if the information is complex and emotionally charged, but probably not if the information is simple and emotionally neutral.Researchers now hypothesize that slow-wave sleep (SWS), which is deep, restorative sleep, also plays a significant role in declarative memory by processing and consolidating newly acquired information.Another area that researchers study is the impact that a lack of adequate sleep has on learning and memory.When we are sleep deprived, our focus, attention, and vigilance drift, making it more difficult to receive information.

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